St. Peter Newsletter November 20, 2018

The Thirteenth Sunday of Luke
Leave-Taking (Apodosis) of the Entrance of the Theotokos
St. Katherine the Great

St. Katherine of Alexandria the Great Martyr

Who was St. Katherine the Great?

Living in the capital—the centre of Hellenistic knowledge—and possessed of an uncommon beauty and intellect, Catherine received a most splendid of educations, having studied the works of the finest philosophers and teachers of antiquity.

[…]

At this time the emperor Maximian was himself in Alexandria for a pagan feast day. Because of this, the feast was especially splendid and crowded. The cries of the sacrificial animals, the smoke and the smell of the sacrifices, the endless blazing of fires, and the bustling crowds at the arenas filled Alexandria. Human victims also were brought — because they consigned to death in the fire the confessors in Christ, those not recanting from Him under torture. The Saint’s love for the Christian martyrs and her fervent desire to lighten their fate impelled Katherine to go to the pagan head-priest and ruler of the empire, the emperor-persecutor Maximian.

Introducing herself, the saint confessed her Christian faith and with wisdom denounced the errors of the pagans. The beauty of the maiden captivated the emperor. In order to convince her and show the superiority of pagan wisdom, the emperor gave orders to gather 50 of the most learned men of the empire, but the Saint got the better of the wise men, such that they themselves came to believe in Christ. Saint Katherine shielded them with the sign of the cross, and they bravely accepted death for Christ and were burnt by order of the emperor.

On the following day they again brought the her to the judgment court where, under the threat of being broken on the wheel, they urged that she recant from the Christian faith and offer sacrifice to the pagan gods. The saint steadfastly confessed Christ and she herself approached the wheels; but an Angel smashed the instruments of execution, which broke up into pieces with many pagans passing nearby. Having beheld this wonder, the empress Augusta and the imperial courtier Porphyry with 200 soldiers confessed their faith in Christ in front of everyone, and they were beheaded. Maximian again tried to entice Saint Katherine, proposing marriage to her, and again he received a refusal. She confessed her fidelity to the Heavenly Bridegroom — Christ, and with a prayer to Him she herself put her head on the block under the sword of the executioner.

Read the complete biography on the Orthodox Church of America website.

 

Entrance of the Theotokos Divine Liturgy on Tuesday, November 20, 2017 at 6:30pm

Entrance of the Theotokos into the Temple

Entrance of the Theotokos into the Temple

The Entrance of the Theotokos into the Temple, also called The Presentation, is one of the Great Feasts of the Orthodox Church, celebrated on November 21.

According to Tradition, the Theotokos was taken – presented – by her parents Joachim and Anna into the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem as a young girl, where she lived and served as a Temple virgin until her betrothal to St. Joseph. One of the earliest sources of this tradition is the non-canonical Protoevangelion of James, also called the Infancy Gospel of James.

Mary was solemnly received by the temple community which was headed by the priest Zacharias, the father of John the Baptist. She was led to the holy place to become herself the “holy of holies” of God, the living sanctuary and temple of the Divine child who was to be born in her. The Church also sees this feast as a feast which marks the end of the physical temple in Jerusalem as the dwelling place of God.

Source: The OrthodoxWiki website.

 

NOTE DATE CHANGE – St. Nicholas Children’s Celebration on Wednesday, December 6, 2018

St. Nicholas

The date of the program has been moved to December 6, 2018. Bp. Nicholas will be visiting St. Paul’s the day before on December 5, 2018.

The kids love it!

Schedule:

  • St. Nickolas program atarts at 6pm.

Parents: Bring you children!

Christmas Fast Continues

The Nativity Fast is one of the four Canonical Fasting Seasons in the Church year. This is a joyous fast in anticipation of the Nativity of Christ. That is the reason it is less strict than other fasting periods. The fast is divided into two periods. The 1st period is November 15th through December 19th when the traditional fasting discipline (no meat, dairy, fish, wine, and oil) is observed. There is dispensation given for wine and oil on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Similarly, fish, wine, and oil are permitted on Saturdays and Sundays.

The 2nd period is December 20th through 24th when the traditional fasting discipline (no meat, dairy, fish, wine, and oil) is observed. There is dispensation given for wine and oil only on Saturday and Sunday during this period.

Fasting always works in conjuction with prayer and giving alms (helping the poor, giving to worthy charities, etc.). Fasting helps us reorder the interior life, but the reordering does not occur with greater prayer and greater concern for the poor.

The reordering is a clarification — we end up seeing things more clearly, we get stronger in the fight against sin and temptation. The fast always ends on a great Feast Day of our Lord.

For a complete list, visit the Antiochian website or click on the image below:

 

Toys for Tots Drive Until December 2, 2018

Give to Toys for Tots

Let’s make our Second Annual Toys for Tots Drive the best one yet!

Please bring new, unwrapped toys to Church to make Christmas brighter for kids who otherwise would have none.

A Toys for Tots contribution box will be in the Social Hall until December 2, 2018.

Every child deserves a Christmas!

 

Interfaith Charities Needs Soups

Interfaith Charities, the local assembly of churches that helps the poor in our area, needs soups.

Publix is running a two for one on soups this week. Buy some and give double!

If you bring to the church, we will get them to Interfaith Charities.

 

Calendar At A Glance

  • Thursday, November 15 — Christmas Fast Begins
  • Tuesday, November 20, 2018 — 6:30pm Entrance of the Theotokos Divine Liturgy
  • Wednesday December 6, 2018 — St. Nicholas Celebration. 6:00pm.

Wisdom From The Elders

The Word of God must be understood as the holy fathers understood it, as the Orthodox Church understands it, and not as we ourselves might wish. Priest Daniel Sysoev

What we gain from fasting does not compensate for what we lose through anger. Our profit from scriptural reading in no way equals the damage we cause ourselves by showing contempt for a brother. We must practice fasting, vigils, withdrawal, and the meditation of Scripture as activities which are subordinate to our main objective, purity of heart, that is to say, love, and we must never disturb this principal virtue for the sake of those others. If this virtue remains whole and unharmed within us nothing can injure us, not even if we are forced to omit any of those other subordinate virtues. Nor will it be of any use to have practiced all these latter if there is missing in us that principal objective for the sake of which all else is undertaken. St. John Cassian

The chief thing is faith, or the spiritual vision of the Lord and the hope of receiving everything from Him, as the Most-merciful, the Most-true. This is the truth! This is from experience! Righteous John, Wonderworker of Kronstadt

Stablish in your heart the following truth: one thing alone is worthy of all our hatred— that is, sin or vice; and towards men nourish exclusively love. Righteous John, Wonderworker of Kronstadt

Coming to understand the passions rightly is a critical need in the Christian life—and this is nowhere truer than in our present world, where the desires and impulses of the mind are often conceived of as good in themselves. Bishop Irenei Steenberg

Remember in Your Prayers

Helen (Rogers)
Doug Spencer
Kathy Spencer
Kathy D
Andreas
Sofia Tešanovic
Paul
Dennis H. and Family
Victor Evan
Ann
James
Vasiliki
Efstratia
Alexandra
Nikos
Georgia
Ioannis
Costandinos
Jeffrey
Vaso
Dave
Dimitri – Presbyter
Vassiliki
Octavio
Tom
Carl
Rena
Nikolay (5 year old boy in Bulgaria whose parents asked us to pray)
David
Eva K.
Rosie
Kathryn
Jeremy
Constantine
Robert
Jane
Theodora
David
Gina
Baby Brynn L.
Micheal
Haralambos
Lillian
Presbytera Rosy
Valentina
Eva W.
Barbara
Angela
Carol Ann
Matthew
Chrysostom
Tim
Pat
Christina
Maria Louise
Maximos
Marian
Photini
Nicholas
Sarah
Petronia (Wife of Phil Pappas)
Constantine Houpis
Anna Marie Smith Baker
Ron Chromulak
Beverly Chromulak
Katerina
Loucine Kassis
Mary Kassis
Baby Maximus
Christine
Maria
Annette Star
Claire Livaditis
Eva Chandilles
Baby Dani
Scott Nedoff
James Hord
Tom

How should we pray for the sick? Remember them daily. Say their names (first names are sufficient) and ask God to bestow mercy and grace on them.

Add or remove names and print this list for easy reference during your prayer time on the St. Peter website.

 

Sunday Readings

Christ Giving Blessing

Epistle

For the Twenty-fifth Sunday after Pentecost

For St. Katherine the Great-Martyr

God is wondrous in His saints.
Bless God in the congregations.

The Reading from the Epistle of St. Paul to the Galatians. (3:23-4:5)

Brethren, before faith came, we were confined under the Law, kept under restraint until faith should be revealed. So that the Law was our custodian until Christ came, that we might be justified by faith. But now that faith has come, we are no longer under a custodian; for in Christ Jesus you are all sons of God, through faith. For as many of you as were baptized into Christ have put on Christ. There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is neither male nor female; for you are all one in Christ Jesus. And if you are Christ’s, then you are Abraham’s offspring, heirs according to promise. I mean that the heir, as long as he is a child, is no better than a slave, though he is the owner of all the estate; but he is under guardians and trustees until the date set by the father. So with us; when we were children, we were slaves to the elemental spirits of the universe. But when the time had fully come, God sent forth His Son, to redeem those who were under the Law, so that we might receive adoption as sons.

Gospel

For the Thirteenth Sunday of Luke

The Reading from the Holy Gospel according to St. Luke. (18:18-27)

At that time, a man came testing Jesus and asking, “Good Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?” And Jesus said to him, “Why do you call Me good? No one is good but God alone. You know the commandments: ‘Do not commit adultery. Do not kill. Do not steal. Do not bear false witness. Honor your father and mother.’” And the man said, “All these I have observed from my youth.” And when Jesus heard it, he said to him, “One thing you still lack. Sell all that you have and distribute to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; and come, follow Me.”

But when the man heard this he became sad, for he was very rich. Jesus, seeing him sad, said, “How hard it is for those who have riches to enter the kingdom of God! For it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God.” Those who heard it said, “Then who can be saved?” Jesus said, “What is impossible with men is possible with God.”

St. Peter Orthodox Church

St. Peter Newsletter November 13, 2018






The Ninth Sunday of Luke

Holy Martyr Plato of Ancyra; Martyr Romanos of Antioch;
Martyrs Zacchaeus the Deacon and Alphaeos the reader of Caesarea in Palestine

St. Plato the Great

St. Plato the Great

Who was St. Plato the Great?

The Holy Martyr Plato, brother of the Holy Martyr Antiochus the Physician (July 16), was born in the city of Ancyra in Galatia. While still a youth he left home and went through the cities, preaching the word of God to pagans, amazing his audience with the persuasiveness and beauty of his speech, and his profound knowledge of Greek learning.

Because of his preaching he was arrested and brought for trial to the temple of Zeus before the governor Agrippinus. At first, the judge attempted to persuade the Saint to turn away from Christ by flattery. He assured the youth that he might be on a par of intellect with the greatest of the philosophers Plato, if only he worshiped also the pagan gods. To this Saint Plato answered, that the wisdom of the philosopher, although great, was but ephemeral and limited, whereas the true, eternal and unbounded wisdom comprised the Gospel teachings.

[…]

When the governor counseled him to avoid death and save his life by worshiping the idols, Plato said: “There are two deaths, the one temporal and the other eternal; so also are there two lives, one of short duration and the other without end.” Then the judge promised to give him his beautiful niece for his wife if he would deny Christ. He also threatened him with torture and death if he refused. Plato replied that he chose a temporal death for the sake of eternal life. The patience of the governor was exhausted, and he gave orders to ten soldiers to mercilessly beat the Martyr, and then send him off to prison.

[…]

After his tortures they threw him in prison for eighteen more days without bread or water. When the guards were amazed that Plato was able to live in hunger for so long, he told them: “You are satisfied by meat, but I, by holy prayers. Wine gladdens you, but Christ the True Vine gladdens me.” Seeing that this did not shake the Martyr, they offered him his life and freedom if he would only say, “Great is the god Apollo.” The Martyr refused to deny Christ or to sacrifice to the idols. Therefore, Agrippinus ordered the Holy Martyr Plato to be beheaded in the year 266.

Read the complete biography on the Mystagogy website.

Christmas Fast Begins November 15, 2017

The Nativity Fast is one of the four Canonical Fasting Seasons in the Church year. This is a joyous fast in anticipation of the Nativity of Christ. That is the reason it is less strict than other fasting periods. The fast is divided into two periods. The 1st period is November 15th through December 19th when the traditional fasting discipline (no meat, dairy, fish, wine, and oil) is observed. There is dispensation given for wine and oil on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Similarly, fish, wine, and oil are permitted on Saturdays and Sundays.

The 2nd period is December 20th through 24th when the traditional fasting discipline (no meat, dairy, fish, wine, and oil) is observed. There is dispensation given for wine and oil only on Saturday and Sunday during this period.

Fasting always works in conjuction with prayer and giving alms (helping the poor, giving to worthy charities, etc.). Fasting helps us reorder the interior life, but the reordering does not occur with greater prayer and greater concern for the poor.

The reordering is a clarification — we end up seeing things more clearly, we get stronger in the fight against sin and temptation. The fast always ends on a great Feast Day of our Lord.

For a complete list, visit the Antiochian website or click on the image below:

 

Entrance of the Theotokos Divine Liturgy on Tuesday, November 20, 2017 at 6:30pm

Entrance of the Theotokos into the Temple

Entrance of the Theotokos into the Temple

The Entrance of the Theotokos into the Temple, also called The Presentation, is one of the Great Feasts of the Orthodox Church, celebrated on November 21.

According to Tradition, the Theotokos was taken – presented – by her parents Joachim and Anna into the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem as a young girl, where she lived and served as a Temple virgin until her betrothal to St. Joseph. One of the earliest sources of this tradition is the non-canonical Protoevangelion of James, also called the Infancy Gospel of James.

Mary was solemnly received by the temple community which was headed by the priest Zacharias, the father of John the Baptist. She was led to the holy place to become herself the “holy of holies” of God, the living sanctuary and temple of the Divine child who was to be born in her. The Church also sees this feast as a feast which marks the end of the physical temple in Jerusalem as the dwelling place of God.

Source: The OrthodoxWiki website.

 

Mark You Calendar – St. Nicholas Children’s Celebration on Wednesday, December 5, 2018

St. Nicholas

The kids love it!

Schedule:

  • St. Nicholas Divine Liturgy at 6pm.
  • St. Nickolas program follows.

Parents: Bring you children!

 

Toys for Tots Drive Until December 2, 2018

Give to Toys for Tots

Let’s make our Second Annual Toys for Tots Drive the best one yet!

Please bring new, unwrapped toys to Church to make Christmas brighter for kids who otherwise would have none.

A Toys for Tots contribution box will be in the Social Hall until December 2, 2018.

Every child deserves a Christmas!

 

Interfaith Charities Needs Soups

Interfaith Charities, the local assembly of churches that helps the poor in our area, needs soups.

Publix is running a two for one on soups this week. Buy some and give double!

If you bring to the church, we will get them to Interfaith Charities.

 

Calendar At A Glance

  • Thursday, November 15 — Christmas Fast Begins
  • Tuesday, November 20, 2018 — 6:30pm Entrance of the Theotokos Divine Liturgy
  • Wednesday December 5, 2018 — St. Nicholas Celebration. Evening begins with Divine Liturgy at 6:00pm.

Wisdom From The Elders

Be careful because wine to a young man becomes blood and to an old man it becomes water. Elder Arsenios the Cave-Dweller

Learn to know the spirit of the age, study it, so whenever possible you will be able to avoid its influence. Bishop Ignatius Brianchaninov

Geronda, when someone is not needy but pretends to be, should we help him? – Christ said, We should give to him who begs from us without examining. Even if someone who begs from you is not in need, you should still give to him. Be happy in giving to him. Elder Paisios of Mount Athos

Do not be surprised that you fall every day; do not give up, but stand your ground courageously. And assuredly, the angel who guards you will honour your patience. St. John Climacus

Obedience is love, but disobedience is non-love, it is the trampling upon love. Never decline from obedience. Archbishop Seraphim (Sobolev) of Bogucharsk

Remember in Your Prayers

Helen (Rogers)
Doug Spencer
Kathy Spencer
Kathy D
Andreas
Sofia Tešanovic
Paul
Carmine John Anthony
Dennis H. and Family
Victor Evan
Ann
James
Vasiliki
Efstratia
Alexandra
Nikos
Georgia
Ioannis
Costandino
Jeffrey
Vaso
Dave
Dimitri – Presbyter
Vassiliki
Octavio
Tom
Carl
Rena
Nikolay (5 year old boy in Bulgaria whose parents asked us to pray)
David
Eva K.
Rosie
Kathryn
Jeremy

Constantine
Robert
Jane
Theodora
David
Gina
Baby Brynn L.
Micheal
Haralambos
Lillian
Presbytera Rosy
Valentina
Eva W.
Barbara
Angela
Carol Ann
Matthew
Chrysostom
Tim
Pat
Christina
Maria Louise
Maximos
Marian
Photini
Nicholas
Sarah
Petronia (Wife of Phil Pappas)
Constantine Houpis
Anna Marie Smith Baker
Ron Chromulak
Beverly Chromulak
Katerina
Loucine Kassis
Mary Kassis
Baby Maximus
Christine
Maria
Annette Star
Claire Livaditis
Eva Chandilles
Baby Dani
Scott Nedoff
James Hord
Tom

How should we pray for the sick? Remember them daily. Say their names (first names are sufficient) and ask God to bestow mercy and grace on them.

Add or remove names and print this list for easy reference during your prayer time on the St. Peter website.

 

Sunday Readings

Christ Giving Blessing

Epistle

For the Twenty-fifth Sunday after Pentecost

Make your vows to the Lord our God and perform them.
God is known in Judah; His Name is great in Israel.

The Reading from the Epistle of St. Paul to the Ephesians. (4:1-7)

Brethren, I, a prisoner for the Lord, beg you to lead a life worthy of the calling to which you have been called, with all lowliness and meekness, with patience, forbearing one another in love, eager to maintain the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace. There is one body and one Spirit, just as you were called to the one hope that belongs to your call, one Lord, one faith, one baptism, one God and Father of us all, Who is above all and through all and in all. But grace was given to each of us according to the measure of Christ’s gift.

Gospel

For the Ninth Sunday of Luke

The Reading from the Holy Gospel according to St. Luke. (12:16-21)

The Lord spoke this parable: “The land of a rich man brought forth plentifully; and he thought to himself, ‘What shall I do, for I have nowhere to store my crops?’ And he said, ‘I will do this: I will pull down my barns, and build larger ones; and there I will store all my grain and my goods. And I will say to my soul, Soul, you have ample goods laid up for many years; take your ease, eat, drink, be merry.’ But God said to him, ‘Fool! This night your soul is required of you; and the things you have prepared, whose will they be?’ So is he who lays up treasure for himself, and is not rich toward God.” As He said this, Jesus called out, “He who has ears to hear, let him hear.”

St. Peter Orthodox Church

St. Peter Orthodox Church Newsletter November 6, 2018

The Seventh Sunday of Luke

St. Menas of Egypt the Wonderworker

Martyrs Victor and Stephanie in Damascus
Martyr Vincent of Spain, Venerable Theodore the Studite
Blessed Maximos the Fool-for-Christ
Martyr Stephen of Dechani, King of Serbia,Stephen
Urosh and Princess Milica
Martin the Merciful, Bishop of Tours

Who was Menas of Egypt the Wonderworker?

Saint Menas, who had Egypt as his fatherland, contested in Cotyaeion of Phrygia in 296 during the reign of Diocletian and Maximian. A soldier distinguished for his valour in war, he renounced his rank and withdrew to devote himself to ascetical struggles and prayer in the mountains.

Filled with zeal and more than human courage, he presented himself in the midst of a pagan festival in Cotyaeion and declared himself to be a Christian. After terrible torments which he endured with astonishing courage, he was beheaded.

His martyrium in Egypt became a place of universal pilgrimage; evidence of ancient journeys to his shrine have been found as far away as Ireland. The glory and refuge of the Christians of Egypt, he has been revealed to be a worker of great miracles and a swift defender for all who call on him with faith; besides all else, he is also invoked for help in finding lost objects.

Source: The Greek Orthodox Archdiocese website.

 

Divine Liturgy at St. Paul’s for the Synaxis of the Archangels and Bodiless Powers on Wednesday, November 7, 2018 — Orthros 6:00pm, Liturgy 7:00pm

Synaxis of the Archangels and Bodiless Powers

The Divine Liturgy for the Synaxis of the Archangels and Bodiless Powers will be held at St. Paul’s on Wednesday, November 7, 2018. Orthros 6:00pm, Liturgy 7:00pm

The Synaxis of the Chief of the Heavenly Hosts, Archangel Michael and the Other Heavenly Bodiless Powers: Archangels Gabriel, Raphael, Uriel, Selaphiel, Jehudiel, Barachiel, and Jeremiel was established at the beginning of the fourth century at the Council of Laodicea, which met several years before the First Ecumenical Council. The 35th Canon of the Council of Laodicea condemned and denounced as heretical the worship of angels as gods and rulers of the world, but affirmed their proper veneration.

Source: Orthodox Church of America website.

 

Divine Liturgy for St Nektarios on Thursday, November 8, 2017 at 6:30pm

St. Nectarios

The divine Nektarios of Aegina, is one of the most widely known of Greek Orthodox Saints. He was born on October 1st, 1846 in Silyvria, in Asia Minor (now occupied by Turkey).His great service to the Church, prolific writings and teachings, energy and zeal led Fr Nektarios to be ordained as the Metropolitan of Pentapolis in Egypt.

In 1904, our Saint founded a monastery for women in Aegina, the Holy Trinity Convent. Under his guidance the Convent flourished. In 1908, the Blessed Nektarios, at the age of 62, retired from the Rizarios Ecclesiastical School and withdrew to Holy Trinity Convent in Aegina. There, for the rest of his life as a true monk and ascetic. He served as a confessor and spiritual guide to the nuns and even priests from as far as Athens and Piraeus. His Holy and pious life shone forth like a guiding light to all near him. Many would come to him for healing. Saint Nektarios was a great ëWonder-workerí even while alive.

On September 20, 1920 one of the nuns took him to the local hospital, in spite of his protest. He was convulsing in pain from a long-standing ailment. He was admitted, and placed into a ward reserved for the poor and unwanted. There he stayed for two months among the sick and dying. At 10:30 in the evening of November 8th, although in the midst of terrible pains, in peace and at prayer he gave up his spirit unto God at the age of 74.

As soon as the Saint gave up his Spirit, a nurse came to prepare him for transfer to Aegina for burial. As the nurse removed the Saints sweater, she inadvertently placed it on the next bed, on which a paralytic lay. And O, strange wonder!, the paralytic immediately began to regain his strength and arose from his bed healthy, and glorifying God.

Read the complete story on the Orthodox Christian Info website.

Christmas Fast Begins November 15, 2017

The Nativity Fast is one of the four Canonical Fasting Seasons in the Church year. This is a joyous fast in anticipation of the Nativity of Christ. That is the reason it is less strict than other fasting periods. The fast is divided into two periods. The 1st period is November 15th through December 19th when the traditional fasting discipline (no meat, dairy, fish, wine, and oil) is observed. There is dispensation given for wine and oil on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Similarly, fish, wine, and oil are permitted on Saturdays and Sundays.

The 2nd period is December 20th through 24th when the traditional fasting discipline (no meat, dairy, fish, wine, and oil) is observed. There is dispensation given for wine and oil only on Saturday and Sunday during this period.

Fasting always works in conjuction with prayer and giving alms (helping the poor, giving to worthy charities, etc.). Fasting helps us reorder the interior life, but the reordering does not occur with greater prayer and greater concern for the poor.

The reordering is a clarification — we end up seeing things more clearly, we get stronger in the fight against sin and temptation. The fast always ends on a great Feast Day of our Lord.

For a complete list, visit the Antiochian website or click on the image below:

 

Entrance of the Theotokos Divine Liturgy on Tuesday, November 20, 2017 at 6:30pm

Entrance of the Theotokos into the Temple

Entrance of the Theotokos into the Temple

The Entrance of the Theotokos into the Temple, also called The Presentation, is one of the Great Feasts of the Orthodox Church, celebrated on November 21.

According to Tradition, the Theotokos was taken – presented – by her parents Joachim and Anna into the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem as a young girl, where she lived and served as a Temple virgin until her betrothal to St. Joseph. One of the earliest sources of this tradition is the non-canonical Protoevangelion of James, also called the Infancy Gospel of James.

Mary was solemnly received by the temple community which was headed by the priest Zacharias, the father of John the Baptist. She was led to the holy place to become herself the “holy of holies” of God, the living sanctuary and temple of the Divine child who was to be born in her. The Church also sees this feast as a feast which marks the end of the physical temple in Jerusalem as the dwelling place of God.

Source: The OrthodoxWiki website.

 

Mark You Calendar – St. Nicholas Children’s Celebration on Wednesday, December 5, 2018

St. Nicholas

The kids love it! Details and time to be announced.

 

Toys for Tots Drive Until December 2, 2018

Give to Toys for Tots

Let’s make our Second Annual Toys for Tots Drive the best one yet!

Please bring new, unwrapped toys to Church to make Christmas brighter for kids who otherwise would have none.

A Toys for Tots contribution box will be in the Social Hall until December 2, 2018.

Every child deserves a Christmas!

 

Interfaith Charities Needs Food, Clothing, Towels, and Bedding

Interfaith Charities Logo

Interfaith Charities, the local assembly of churches that helps the poor in our area, needs:

  • Canned vegetables
  • Canned fruit
  • Tuna
  • Jelly
  • Other food items you can give (peanut butter, spaghetti, etc.)

They also need:

  • Bedding
  • Towels
  • Clothing
  • Shoes
  • Other items that can be used but in good condition.

If you bring to the church, we will get them to Interfaith Charities.

 

Calendar At A Glance

  • Wednesday, November 7, 2018 — Synaxis of the Archangels Divine Liturgy at St. Paul Orthodox Church. 6:00pm Orthros, 7:00pm Divine Liturgy
  • Thursday, November 8, 2018 — 6:30pm St. Nectarios Divine Liturgy
  • Thursday, November 15 — Christmas Fast Begins
  • Tuesday, November 20, 2018 — 6:30pm Entrance of the Theotokos Divine Liturgy
  • Wednesday December 5, 2018 — St. Nicholas Celebration. Time TBA

Wisdom From The Elders

Acts of charity, almsgiving and all the external good works do not suppress the arrogance of the heart; but noetic meditation, the labor of repentance, contrition and humility—these humble the proud mind.
Elder Joseph the Hesychast

It would be a good thing had we no need of the written Scriptures but instead had the Holy Spirit living and active in our hearts. But because we lost the grace of the Holy Spirit, God, in his love and mercy gave us the holy Scriptures. And how bad are you if having lost the Holy Spirit and received the holy scriptures you don’t even read the holy scriptures.
St. John Chrysostom

The intellect does many good and bad things without the body, whereas the body can do neither good nor evil without the intellect. This is because the law of freedom applies to what happens before we act.
Saint Kosmas Aitolos

He who created us without our help, will not save us without our consent.
Blessed Augustine

But do not be troubled or sad. The Lord sometimes allows people who are devoted to Him to fall into such dreadful vices; and this is in order to prevent them from falling into a still greater sin—pride. Your temptation will pass and you will spend the remaining days of your life in humility. Only do not forget your sin.
St. Seraphim of Sarov

Remember in Your Prayers

Kathy D
Andreas
Sofia Tešanovic
Paul
Carmine John Anthony
Dennis H. and Family
Victor Evan
Ann
James
David (Speakman)
Joyce (Speakman)
Vasiliki
Efstratia
Alexandra
Nikos
Georgia
Ioannis
Costandino
Jeffrey
Vaso
Dave
Dimitri – Presbyter
Vassiliki
Octavio
Tom
Carl
Rena
Nikolay (5 year old boy in Bulgaria whose parents asked us to pray)
David
Eva K.
Rosie
Kathryn
Jeremy

Constantine
Robert
Jane
Theodora
David
Gina
Baby Brynn L.
Micheal
Haralambos
Lillian
Presbytera Rosy
Valentina
John
Eva W.
Barbara
Angela
Carol Ann
Matthew
Chrysostom
Tim
Pat
Christina
Maria Louise
Maximos
Marian
Photini
Nicholas
Sarah
Petronia (Wife of Phil Pappas)
Constantine Houpis
Anna Marie Smith Baker
Ron Chromulak
Beverly Chromulak
Katerina
Loucine Kassis
Mary Kassis
Baby Maximus
Christine
Maria
Annette Star
Claire Livaditis
Eva Chandilles
Baby Dani
Scott Nedoff
James Hord
Tom

How should we pray for the sick? Remember them daily. Say their names (first names are sufficient) and ask God to bestow mercy and grace on them.

Add or remove names and print this list for easy reference during your prayer time on the St. Peter website.

 

Sunday Readings

Christ Giving Blessing

Epistle

For St. Menas

The Lord will give strength to His people.
Ascribe to the Lord, O children of God, ascribe to the Lord glory and honor.

The Reading from the Second Epistle of St. Paul to the Corinthians. (4:6-15)

Brethren, it is the God Who said, “Let light shine out of darkness,” Who has shone in our hearts to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Christ. But we have this treasure in earthen vessels, to show that the transcendent power belongs to God and not to us. We are afflicted in every way, but not crushed; perplexed, but not driven to despair; persecuted, but not forsaken; struck down, but not destroyed; always carrying in the body the death of Jesus, so that the life of Jesus may also be manifested in our bodies. While we live we are always being given up to death for Jesus’ sake, so that the life of Jesus may be manifested in our mortal flesh. So death is at work in us, but life in you. Since we have the same spirit of faith as he had who wrote, “I believed, and so I spoke,” we too believe, and so we speak, knowing that He Who raised the Lord Jesus will raise us also with Jesus and bring us with you into His presence. For it is all for your sake, so that as grace extends to more and more people it may increase thanksgiving, to the glory of God.

Gospel

For the Eighth Sunday of Luke

The Reading from the Holy Gospel according to St. Luke. (10:25-37)

At that time, a lawyer stood up to put Jesus to the test, saying, “Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?” Jesus said to him, “What is written in the Law? How do you read?” And the lawyer answered, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your strength, and with all your mind; and your neighbor as yourself.” And Jesus said to him, “You have answered right; do this, and you will live.” But the lawyer, desiring to justify himself, said to Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?”

Jesus replied, “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and he fell among robbers, who stripped him and beat him, and departed, leaving him half dead. Now by chance a priest was going down that road; and when he saw him he passed by on the other side. So likewise a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. But a Samaritan, as he journeyed, came to where he was; and when he saw him, he had compassion, and went to him and bound up his wounds, pouring on oil and wine; then he set him on his own beast and brought him to an inn, and took care of him. And the next day he took out two denarii and gave them to the innkeeper, saying, ‘Take care of him; and whatever more you spend, I will repay you when I come back.’

Which of these three, do you think, proved neighbor to the man who fell among the robbers?” The lawyer said, “The one who showed mercy on him.” And Jesus said to him, “Go and do likewise.”

St. Peter Orthodox Church

St. Peter Newsletter October 30, 2018

The Fifth Sunday of Luke

The Venerable Ioanikios the Great of Mount Olympus
Hieromartyrs Nicander the Bishop of Myra and Hermias the Priest
Martyr Porphyrios of Ephesus
Emperor John the Merciful

Who was Venerable Ioanikios the Great?

Ioannikios was born in the village of Marikata in the province of Bithynia in Asia Minor. He was raised by his father Myritrikios and mother Anastasia as a shepherd. As a young shepherd, Ioannikios often retreated into solitude and prayer while tending his sheep. As an adult he was called to duty as a soldier and served with courage, particularly in the wars with the Bulgarians.

After his military service, Ioannikios became an ascetic, withdrawing to Mount Olympus in Asia Minor. There, he was tonsured a monk. Ioannikios lived as an ascetic for over fifty years, traveling to many places during which he received from God the gift of wonderworking. He healed sicknesses, drove out demons, and tamed wild beasts. He was distinguished by overwhelming humility and meekness. His physical appearance was that of a giant – massive and powerful.

Having taken an active part in the destiny of God’s Church, he entered the iconoclast controversy, first supporting iconoclasm, but finding himself deceived, he tore himself away from the iconoclast position and became an ardent iconodule who championed the veneration of icons. He enjoyed a close friendship with Patriarch Methodius of Constantinople. Ioannikios reposed peacefully in the Lord in the year 846, having lived ninety-four years.

Source: The Antiochian Orthodox Church website.

 

Fr. Hans Out of Town October 31 to November 3, 2018

Fr. Hans will be out of town from Wednesday October 31 until Saturday November 3.

For pastoral emergencies please contact Fr. Paul Girgus of St. Paul Orthodox Church at 509-845-4540.

 

Community Luncheon on Thursday, November 1, 2018 at 12:00pm

Community Dinner

You are invited to join your St. Peter’s friends for lunch and fellowship at 12 noon on Thursday, September at 12:00pm.

Barbara Dionysopoulos and friends are preparing a delicious meal for all our members. Come and join us to enjoy some good food and the company of your friends. Make some new friends too and get to know other parishioners.

Reservations are required! Please call Barbara at 239-826-1655 or sign up in the Social Hall after Divine Liturgy.

The cost is underwritten by an anonymous sponsor (Thank you sponsor!) but donations to the building fund are welcome.

 

Toys for Tots Drive Until December 2, 2018

Give to Toys for Tots

Let’s make our Second Annual Toys for Tots Drive the best one yet!

Please bring new, unwrapped toys to Church to make Christmas brighter for kids who otherwise would have none.

A Toys for Tots contribution box will be in the Social Hall until December 2, 2018.

Every child deserves a Christmas!

 

Interfaith Charities Needs Food, Clothing, Towels, and Bedding

Interfaith Charities Logo

Interfaith Charities, the local assembly of churches that helps the poor in our area, needs:

  • Canned vegetables
  • Canned fruit
  • Tuna
  • Jelly
  • Other food items you can give (peanut butter, spaghetti, etc.)

They also need:

  • Bedding
  • Towels
  • Clothing
  • Shoes
  • Other items that can be used but in good condition.

If you bring to the church, we will get them to Interfaith Charities.

 

Calendar At A Glance

  • Thursday, October 31 to November 3, 2018 — Fr. Hans Out of Town
  • Thursday, November 1, 2018 — 12:00pm Community Luncheon
 

Wisdom From The Elders

Do not judge others, for this alone will intercede for us during any judgement before God. St. Macarius of Optina

Watch, therefore, for you know not on what day your Lord cometh. Apostle Matthew, Matthew: 24

So first of all you must learn to sit with yourself and to face boredom…Once you have learned not to fidget, then you can do anything, at any speed, with any amount of attention and briskness… Metropolitan Anthony of Sourozh

Adam, God’s first-formed man, transgressed: could He[God] not at once have brought death upon him? But see what the Lord does, in His great love towards man. He casts him out from Paradise, for because of sin he was unworthy to live there; but He puts him to dwell over against Paradise: that seeing whence he had fallen, and from what and into what a state he was brought down, he might afterwards be saved by repentance. St. Cyril of Jerusalem

Prayer must arise from repentance, contrition, and above all, humility. Elder Sergei of Vanves

 

Remember in Your Prayers

Kathy D
Andreas
Sofia Tešanovic
Paul
Carmine John Anthony
Dennis H. and Family
Victor Evan
Ann
James
David (Speakman)
Joyce (Speakman)
Vasiliki
Efstratia
Alexandra
Nikos
Georgia
Ioannis
Costandino
Jeffrey
Vaso
Dave
Dimitri – Presbyter
Vassiliki
Octavio
Tom
Carl
Rena
Nikolay (5 year old boy in Bulgaria whose parents asked us to pray)
David
Eva K.
Rosie
Kathryn
Jeremy

Constantine
Robert
Jane
Theodora
David
Gina
Baby Brynn L.
Micheal
Haralambos
Lillian
Presbytera Rosy
Valentina
John
Eva W.
Barbara
Angela
Carol Ann
Matthew
Chrysostom
Tim
Pat
Christina
Maria Louise
Maximos
Marian
Photini
Nicholas
Sarah
Petronia (Wife of Phil Pappas)
Constantine Houpis
Anna Marie Smith Baker
Ron Chromulak
Beverly Chromulak
Katerina
Loucine Kassis
Mary Kassis
Baby Maximus
Christine
Maria
Annette Star
Claire Livaditis
Eva Chandilles
Baby Dani
Scott Nedoff
James Hord
Tom

How should we pray for the sick? Remember them daily. Say their names (first names are sufficient) and ask God to bestow mercy and grace on them.

Add or remove names and print this list for easy reference during your prayer time on the St. Peter website.

 

Sunday Readings

Christ Giving Blessing

Epistle

For the Twenty-third Sunday after Pentecost

O Lord, save Thy people and bless Thine inheritance.
To Thee, O Lord, have I cried, O my God.

The Reading from the Epistle of St. Paul to the Ephesians. (2:4-10)

Brethren, God, Who is rich in mercy, out of the great love with which He loved us, even when we were dead through our trespasses, made us alive together with Christ (by grace you have been saved), and raised us up with Him, and made us sit with Him in the heavenly places in Christ Jesus, that in the coming ages He might show the immeasurable riches of His grace in kindness toward us in Christ Jesus. For by grace you have been saved through faith; and this is not your own doing, it is the gift of God—not because of works, lest any man should boast. For, we are His workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them.

Gospel

For the Fifth Sunday of Luke

The Reading from the Holy Gospel according to St. Luke. (16:19-31)

The Lord said, “There was a rich man, who was clothed in purple and fine linen and who feasted sumptuously every day. And at his gate lay a poor man named Lazarus, full of sores, who desired to be fed with what fell from the rich man’s table; moreover, the dogs came and licked his sores. The poor man died and was carried by the angels to Abraham’s bosom. The rich man also died and was buried; and in Hades, being in torment, he lifted up his eyes, and saw Abraham far off and Lazarus in his bosom. And he called out, ‘Father Abraham, have mercy upon me, and send Lazarus to dip the end of his finger in water and cool my tongue; for I am in anguish in this flame.’ But Abraham said, ‘Son, remember that you in your lifetime received your good things, and Lazarus in like manner evil things; but now he is comforted here, and you are in anguish. And besides all this, between us and you a great chasm has been fixed, in order that those who would pass from here to you may not be able, and none may cross from there to us.’ And he said, ‘Then I beg you, father, to send him to my father’s house, for I have five brothers, so that he may warn them, lest they also come into this place of torment.’ But Abraham said, ‘They have Moses and the prophets; let them hear them.’ And he said, ‘No, father Abraham; but if someone goes to them from the dead, they will repent.’ He said to him, ‘If they do not hear Moses and the prophets, neither will they be convinced if someone should rise from the dead.’”

St. Peter Orthodox Church

St. Peter Newsletter October 23, 2018

The Seventh Sunday of Luke

Martyrs Terence and Neonilla and their Children
Venerable Bishop Stephen of Mar Sabbas Monastery in Palestine
Athanasios I, Patriarch of Constantinople
Venerable Job of Pochaev

St. Neonilla

St. Neonilla

Who were the Martyrs Terence and Neonilla and their Children?

Saint Neonilla was the wife of Saint Terence. They suffered martyrdom with their children Sarbelus, Photius, Theodulus, Hierax, Nita, Vele and Eunice during a persecution of Christianity under the emperor Decius (249-250).

They zealously confessed Christ and denounced idolatry. For this the pagans subjected the entire Christian family to terrible tortures and torments, but failed to get them to renounce the true Faith. So, the holy martyrs were beheaded, and received crowns of martyrdom.

Source: The Antiochian Orthodox Church website.

 

St. Demetrios Divine Liturgy October Thursday, October 25, 2018 at 6:30pm

St. Demetrios

St. Demetrios

We will commemorate St. Demetrios on the eve of his feast day on Thursday, October 25, 2018.

Who Was St. Demetrios?

The holy, glorious and right-victorious Great-martyr Demetrios of Thessaloniki the Myrrh-streamer (also Demetrios) is one of the most popular saints in the Orthodox world. He was martyred around the year 306 in Thessalonica, and his cult rapidly grew during the Middle Ages, when he was regarded as the first recognized patron and protector of the city, militarily as well as spiritually. His feast day is celebrated on October 26. The Serbian Orthodox Church commemorates the Saint as a Mitar having a feast of Mitrovan on November 8.

Demetrios came from a noble family of the Roman province of Macedonia. Through this noble ancestry and through his own ability and virtue he rose to a high military position under Galerius Maximian, Caesar of the Eastern part of the Roman Empire (with Diocletian as the Augustus, or senior emperor). Despite this position in the still-pagan empire, he remained fervent in faith and works for Christ, encouraging many Christians to endure persecution and even bringing many pagans to the faith.

When Maximian returned from one of his campaigns to Thessaloniki, which he had made his capital, he had pagan games and sacrifices celebrated for his triumph. Demetrios was denounced by pagans who were envious of his success, and he was thrown into prison. While in prison he was visited by a young Christian named Nestor, who asked him for a blessing to engage in single combat with the giant Lyaios (or Lyaeus), who was posing as the champion of paganism. Demetrios gave his blessing and Nestor, against all odds, slew his opponent in the arena, as David had once defeated Goliath.

The enraged emperor, learning that this had occurred with Demetrios’s aid, first had Nestor beheaded outside the city and then had Demetrios impaled in prison. Later Demetrios’s servant Lupus was beheaded after using his master’s blood-stained tunic and signet ring to work many miracles. The Christians buried Demetrios and Nestor next together in the bath where Demetrios had been imprisoned. During the seventh century a miraculous flow of fragrant myrrh was found emanating from his tomb, giving rise to the appellation Mirovlitis, the Myrrh Gusher to his name. His tomb containing his relics is now in the crypt of the Church of St. Demetrios in Thessaloniki.

St. Demetrios is revered as the patron saint of Thessaloniki and is believed by the people as having intervened to save the city over the years from invading foreigners, from the Slavic nations, Bulgarians, Arabs, Saracens, and others. While well remembered in the Hellenic world, the memory of the Great Martyr Demetrios of Thessaloniki found an attachment in the Slavic, particularly the Russian, world from the times of the Russian Primary Chronicle.

Source: The Orthodoxwiki website.

Remember This?

First published on September 17, 2017 after hurricane Irma last year.

St. Demetrios Visits St. Peter’s

I shared the following on Facebook earlier this week:

After checking church today I entered my office (dark, no power) and as I opened the door a very strong aroma of myrrh had filled the office, and by strong I mean it was palpable.

I located the source and it came from this icon that had some myrrh from the relics of St Demetrios of Thessaloniki. It exuded through the plastic.

The Orthodox will understand the meaning of this. It is a sign of the protection of St. Demetrios towards our parish. I moved the icon to our still barren altar area.

God is glorified through His Saints.

 

Fr. Hans Out of Town October 31 to November 3, 2018

Fr. Hans will be out of town from Wednesday October 31 until Saturday November 3.

For pastoral emergencies please contact Fr. Paul Girgus of St. Paul Orthodox Church at 509-845-4540.

 

Community Luncheon on Thursday, November 1, 2018 at 12:00pm

Community Dinner

You are invited to join your St. Peter’s friends for lunch and fellowship at 12 noon on Thursday, September at 12:00pm.

Barbara Dionysopoulos and friends are preparing a delicious meal for all our members. Come and join us to enjoy some good food and the company of your friends. Make some new friends too and get to know other parishioners.

Reservations are required! Please call Barbara at 239-826-1655 or sign up in the Social Hall after Divine Liturgy.

The cost is underwritten by an anonymous sponsor (Thank you sponsor!) but donations to the building fund are welcome.

 

Toys for Tots Drive Until December 2, 2018

Give to Toys for Tots

Let’s make our Second Annual Toys for Tots Drive the best one yet!

Please bring new, unwrapped toys to Church to make Christmas brighter for kids who otherwise would have none.

A Toys for Tots contribution box will be in the Social Hall until December 2, 2018.

Every child deserves a Christmas!

 

Interfaith Charities Needs Food, Clothing, Towels, and Bedding

Support Interfaith Charities

Interfaith Charities, the local assembly of churches that helps the poor in our area, needs:

  • Canned vegetables
  • Canned fruit
  • Tuna
  • Jelly
  • Other food items you can give (peanut butter, spaghetti, etc.)

They also need:

  • Bedding
  • Towels
  • Clothing
  • Shoes
  • Other items that can be used but in good condition.

If you bring to the church, we will get them to Interfaith Charities.

 

Calendar At A Glance

  • Thursday, October 25, 2018 — 6:30pm St. Demetrios Divine Liturgy
  • Thursday, October 31 to Saturday November 3, 2018 — Fr. Hans Out of Town
  • Thursday, November, 2018 — 12:00pm Community Luncheon
 

Wisdom From The Elders

Learn to know the spirit of the age, study it, so whenever possible you will be able to avoid its influence. Bishop Ignatius Brianchaninov

When the soul is mature, God will give it inner peace. The Lord watches over us, and He is pleased that you long for His peace. Until the soul is ready, He will only sometimes allow us to see that He is everywhere present and fills all things. At these moments the soul feels such joy! It feels as though it has everything! But then the Lord conceals Himself from us again, in order that we might long for Him and seek Him with our hearts. Elder Thaddeus of Vitovnika

My brothers, have no fear of the punishments of the Lord! For He does not punish us as criminals, but as His own children! Archimandrite Gabriel of the Pskov Caves

Thus, as St. Paul says (cf. 2 Cor. 5:7), we should press forward on the basis of faith, patiently striving to conform ourselves to God’s will. St. Peter of Damaskos

Try to fill your soul with Christ so as not to have it empty. Your soul is like a cistern full of water. If you channel the water to the flowers, that is, to the virtues, you will experience true joy and all the thorns of evil will wither away. But if you channel the water to the weeds, these will grow and choke you and all the flowers will wither. St. Porphyrios of Kafsokalyvia

One may have a good worldly relationship with non-believers, but one cannot have a relationship in prayer and one must not carry on arguments about religion so that the name of God not be offended during an argument. St. Nektary of Optina

 

Remember in Your Prayers

John D.
Kathy D
Andreas
Sofia Tešanovic
Paul
Carmine John Anthony
Dennis H. and Family
Victor Evan
Ann
James
David (Speakman)
Joyce (Speakman)
Vasiliki
Efstratia
Alexandra
Nikos
Georgia
Ioannis
Costandino
Jeffrey
Vaso
Dave
Dimitri – Presbyter
Vassiliki
Octavio
Tom
Carl
Rena
Nikolay (5 year old boy in Bulgaria whose parents asked us to pray)
David
Eva K.
Rosie
Kathryn
Jeremy

Constantine
Robert
Jane
Theodora
David
Gina
Baby Brynn L.
Micheal
Haralambos
Lillian
Presbytera Rosy
Valentina
John
Eva W.
Barbara
Angela
Carol Ann
Matthew
Chrysostom
Tim
Pat
Christina
Maria Louise
Maximos
Marian
Photini
Nicholas
Sarah
Petronia (Wife of Phil Pappas)
Constantine Houpis
Anna Marie Smith Baker
Ron Chromulak
Beverly Chromulak
Katerina
Loucine Kassis
Mary Kassis
Baby Maximus
Christine
Maria
Annette Star
Claire Livaditis
Eva Chandilles
Baby Dani
Scott Nedoff
James Hord
Tom

How should we pray for the sick? Remember them daily. Say their names (first names are sufficient) and ask God to bestow mercy and grace on them.

Add or remove names and print this list for easy reference during your prayer time on the St. Peter website.

 

Sunday Readings

Christ Giving Blessing

Epistle

For the Twenty-secondSunday after Pentecost

Thou, O Lord, shalt preserve us and keep us from this generation.
Save me, O Lord, for the godly man hath disappeared.

The Reading from the Epistle of St. Paul to the Galatians. (6:11-18)

Brethren, see with what large letters I am writing to you with my own hand. It is those who want to make a good showing in the flesh that would compel you to be circumcised and only in order that they may not be persecuted for the cross of Christ. For even those who receive circumcision do not themselves keep the Law, but they desire to have you circumcised that they may glory in your flesh.

But far be it from me to glory except in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, by which the world has been crucified to me and I to the world. For neither circumcision counts for anything, nor uncircumcision, but a new creation. Peace and mercy be upon all, who walk by this rule, upon the Israel of God. Henceforth let no man trouble me; for I bear on my body the marks of Jesus. The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with your spirit, brethren. Amen.

Gospel

For the Seventh Sunday of Luke

The Reading from the Holy Gospel according to St. Luke. (8:41-56)

At that time, there came to Jesus a man named Jairus, who was a ruler of the synagogue; and falling at Jesus’ feet he besought Him to come to his house, for he had an only daughter, about twelve years of age, and she was dying. As Jesus went, the people pressed round Him. And a woman, who had had a flow of blood for twelve years, and had spent all her living upon physicians, and could not be healed by anyone, came up behind Him, and touched the fringe of His garment; and immediately her flow of blood ceased.

And Jesus said, “Who was it that touched Me?” When all denied it, Peter said, “Master, the multitudes surround Thee and press upon Thee! And Thou sayest, ‘Who touched Me?’” But Jesus said, “Someone touched Me; for I perceive that power has gone forth from Me.” And when the woman saw that she was not hidden, she came trembling, and falling down before Him declared in the presence of all the people why she had touched Him, and how she had been immediately healed. And Jesus said to her, “Daughter, your faith has made you well; go in peace.”

While Jesus was still speaking, a man from the ruler’s house came and said, “Your daughter is dead; do not trouble the Teacher any more.” But Jesus on hearing this answered him, “Do not fear; only believe, and she shall be well.” And when Jesus came to the house, He permitted no one to enter with Him, except Peter and James and John, and the father and mother of the child. And all were weeping and bewailing her; but Jesus said, “Do not weep; for she is not dead but sleeping.” And they laughed at him, knowing that she was dead. But taking her by the hand Jesus called, saying, “Child, arise.” And her spirit returned, and she got up at once; and Jesus directed that something should be given her to eat. And her parents were amazed; but He charged them to tell no one what had happened.

St. Peter Orthodox Church